Posts Tagged ‘audio logo’

A while back I posted an article on what an audio mnemonic is (or as some might call it, an audio logo). Today I wanted to share with you a great example from a recent Coca-Cola spot that effectively uses their sonic logo melody throughout the ad.

Coke has always, for as long as I’ve known, been involved in creating a brand around music. One of the key features and most recognizable parts of any audio identity is the audio logo. Before you read on, have a listen to Coke’s audio logo first.

Read on »

Just recently, Coca-Cola released its 2014 FIFA World Cup anthem. They have always used music as a part of their overall strategy and in doing so they have created some memorable ads, but creating an anthem has become an expected part of their marketing plan at worldwide events as you’ll see in a minute.

Famous Coca-Cola advertisment

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It’s only been in the last decade or so that the big three German automobile manufactures have invested in audio branding. We’ve spoke on the Audi sound design and featured the Mercedes Benz audio logo in the past, but lets take a look at BMW.

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Every week we’ll post one of our favourite uses of sound in marketing.

This week check out the wonderful audio logo that Swisscomm has implemented as part of their new brand that was developed in 2008.

Every week we’ll post the best in audio branding.

JYSK is a Danish company who traditionally sold beds and bedding accessories. Back in the 1990s they introduced an audio logo that was loosely based on a traditional song sung by Danish people. The sonic tagline used in this commercial doesn’t have international meaning but it is easily recognized by anyone and is a great source of pride for the company. As we’ve always believed music is an international language and this is a great example.

Enjoy the weekend!

Here we go another edition of Sticky Songs. Every week we’ll post one of the best uses of sound in advertising or branding. We call them sticky because they get stuck in your mind. Can’t say we didn’t warn you.

In a recent move by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) Canadian businesses can now trademark their audio brand assets. This will allow brands to legally protect their audio identity including audio logos, sound IDs and potentially distinctive voices. It puts Canada closer to what has been the norm in many other countries and shows that as a country we are serious about copyright and trademark protection.

One company that will be extremely happy with the decision is Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (MGM). They have been battling their right to trademark their lion roar for nearly 20 years. Now they can enforce protecting their identity will greater force. We’re sure that others will be quick to apply for trademark protection as well.

As audio brand consultants we feel this is a great step in helping businesses see the value of having an audio brand. It truly means that businesses can have sound assets that will grow with them.

An audio logo is the most recognizable part of an effective audio brand. It is useful for any company that wishes to be heard apart from all of the clutter.

An audio logo is a sound bite that is about five seconds long. It is usually played with a visual logo accompanying. Most likely you will here it at the beginning or the end of a commercial advertisement. But, it also has many other uses. Just like its visual partner it can be used as a glue for the brand. It will help unify any sonic property that a brand owns.

Today I’m going to show you what I think is the top 10 audio logos. Enjoy!

Intel

Intel inside has been one of the most successful brand building exercises. Having an audio logo just makes it that much sweeter.

NBC

The iconic three note chime is synonymous with this media company. Learn about the history of the NBC chimes.

McDonald’s

I’m lovin’ this audio logo.

20th Century Fox

Although this one brakes the mold of a traditional audio logo it is highly associated with the company.

MGM

Nothing is more powerful than a roar…except maybe a crying baby.

Yahoo!

Sadly this brand has met some tough competition as of late. The yodle will forever be stuck in my head.

Nokia

Nokia recently crowd sourced a new audio logo, but the classic sound will no doubt be remembered.

LG

It’s a strong reason why life is good.

THX

No movie is complete without it.

Mercedes Benz

It’s like heaven from the skies. Luxury at its best.

If you want to hear my favorite audio logo you’ll have to take a look at last week’s sticky song.

This week I have been reading one of my favorite marketing books “Positioning” By Al Ries and Jack Trout. They reminded me of a business called Mennen. The company was quite successful but line extended themselves out of business or a least a large share of business.

What I found most interesting about the Mennen brand is they are one of the early adopter of the audio logo concept.

Speed Stick – Mennen

Even more awesome was that this audio logo became part of pop culture and appeared in Seinfeld and on Scrubs. By becoming a part of two successful TV shows the Mennen brand is promoted in a low cost/high value method. Tough to do but well worth the work.

As reported in a recent post by DuetsBlog I learned that Gilbert Gottfried has been let go of his duties as the signature voice of the Aflac Duck. So, why is this important to you? Well, assume somehow you lost the original drawings for you company logo, what would you do?

Now, the question for Aflac is how will this change their brand? What are the legal issues that surround this audio brand since it is a trademark of the Aflac company? Can they just go and hire a sound alike? Similar problems like this can also occur when a voice actor moves on to other jobs or passes away as discussed in this voices.com article.

This blog post is not meant to put a damper on the benifits of audio branding. One key point I want to make is that the Gottfried sound, although memorable, is not flexible. It puts a lot of pressure on a company to use as is without change.

A few ways to avoid this type of problem:

  • Select a voice profile instead of a single voice
    This should be part of your brand planning efforts when choosing a signature voice
  • Own the rights to the master recording(s)
  • Choose a melodic audio logo
    McDonald’s “I’m Lovin’ it” is a good example of this

Knowing that music and sound will outlive any single voice actor or brand manager it becomes vital that business mangers plan for the future. How are you planning the future of your brand?

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